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Fiction

An Interview with Brent van Staalduinen

By Alex Carey

Brent van Staalduinen has won our 25th annual Short Fiction Prize for his story "Skinks." Brent van Staalduinen lives, works, and finds his voice in Hamilton. Saints, Unexpected, his novel of urban magical realism, will be published by Invisible Publishing in April 2016. His work appears or is forthcoming in The Sycamore Review, Prairie Fire Magazine, The Bristol Short Story Prize Anthology 8, The Prairie Journal, EVENT Magazine, The Dalhousie Review, The New Quarterly, Litro Magazine, The Nottingham Review, Urban Graffiti, and elsewhere. He is a graduate of the Humber School for Writers and holds an MFA in creative writing from the University of British Columbia, and teaches creative writing at Redeemer University College.

An Interview with Andrew F. Sullivan

By Alex Carey

Fiddlehead Editorial Assistant Alex Carey interviews Andrew F. Sullivan about his new book Waste.

"I pull on things like old myths, urban legends and gothic traditions because that’s where my fuel is. If I’m going to write about three generations of a family in Canada, I hope it’s a story about the bog where they keep their ancestors to consult them on the matters of the day."

The Summer 2015 all-fiction is now available!

The Fiddlehead summer fiction issue is now available, and it’s the perfect read whether you’re lounging at the beach or sitting in a hammock. Spend those long, lazy, hazy days of summer, luxuriating in the fictional worlds of the fifteen stories gathered here. We have stories from established national and international writers such as Daniel Woodrell, D.R. MacDonald, and Kathy Page and stories from up-and-comers such as Charlie Fiset, Rod Moody-Corbett, and Mona’a Malik. And that's just some of the authors found within! . . .

An Interview with Lisa Alward

By Reid Lodge

Lisa Alward has won The Fiddlehead's 24th annual Short Fiction Prize for her story "Cocktail." Originally from Halifax, Lisa Alward has a master’s degree in English from the University of London and was the Literary Press Group’s first sales manager. She presently lives in Fredericton, where she teaches courses in clear writing and has worked as an editor and freelance writer. She has been writing short fiction for three years. “Cocktail,” her second story to be published, is inspired by the cocktail party world of the sixties and early seventies.

An Interview with Fiction Editor Mark Anthony Jarman

By Fiddlehead Staff

Fiction co-editor Mark Anthony Jarman's new book of stories Knife Party at the Hotel Europa has just been released by Goose Lane Editions and is already getting some great reviews. Adam Lawrence at Rover calls Mark a "comfortable outsider" and says of the book: "a sense of transience haunts all the stories." The Fiddlehead asked him some questions about his book, his process, and what he's working on now.

An Interview with Charlie Fiset

By Greg Brown

Charlie Fiset's story "Maggie's Farm" appears in the Autumn 2014 issue.

Her story is a fictitious account based on Fiset’s own European travels, imbued with a Greek mythological theme drawn from Homer’s Odyssey. This story was originally part of Fiset’s creative thesis for her MA in Creative Writing. Fiset was kind enough to offer some insight into “Maggie’s Farm” and her creative process, in response to the following questions.

An Interview with Myler Wilkinson

By Greg Brown Myler Wilkinson has won the 23rd annual Short Fiction Prize for his story "The Blood of Slaves." Myler Wilkinson has published award-winning short stories set in British Columbia in journals such as Prism International and Pierian Spring. He has spent extended periods in Russia and has written three books, including Hemingway and Turgenev: The Nature of Literary Influence. He lives in the Kootenay region of British Columbia. His winning story is written from the point of view of Anton Chekhov and is dedicated to the memory of Alexander Vaschenko, friend of the heart, mentor.

Don't Judge This Book By Its Title

By Zachary Alapi

A Review of J.R. Helton's Drugs

The subject matter of J.R. Helton’s Drugs (Seven Stories Press) might at first appear self-evident, but it is the combination of imbibed adventures, personal struggle, and the exploration of the effects various drugs have on the individual and his/her place in society that make this fictionalized memoir a layered, gripping read.

Grumpy Old Men (On Richler and Sendak)

By Sarah Bernstein

At my Jewish high school in Montreal, Mordecai Richler, of course, was a bit of a hero. Whether or not he liked it, and even though he relentlessly lampooned the Jewish community, he was still one of ours. February at our school was public speaking month. So, every February, the teachers compiled and distributed a list of quotations to all of us groaning, gawky teenagers — possible speech topics from which we were to choose. . . .

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