Skip to content Skip to navigation

Poetry & Techno: May Their Futures Meet at the Beat? (Part 3 of 3)

By Steven Suntres In my mind, the palate for both techno and poetry is a massive suggestion for the two to fuse together and to create on a blank canvas. I foresee an opportunity, both in content and cultural relevance, to create something that is beautiful and authentic in both of these mediums coming together. They are both emotional experiences that could synthesize into a superpower of an emotional medium.

Poetry & Techno: May Their Futures Meet at the Beat? (Part 2 of 3)

By Steven Suntres With electronic music’s meteoric rise over the past decade, the culture infiltrated the mainstream conscious, which came with its faults but ultimately benefited the culture as a whole. Techno became a cultural force taking over the lifestyles of the party demographics all over the continent. . . .

Poetry & Techno: May Their Futures Meet at the Beat? (Part 1 of 3)

By Steven Suntres Poetry and techno are like two of my mind’s closest friends that continually flirt with each other to the point that I’m confused as to why they don’t just quit playing around and start dating. For a while, I thought this was something that only made sense to me, and that I should just keep my opinions to myself; however, when I came across an article in The Atlantic, titled "The Death of the Artist” by William Deresiewicz, I began to think that this is a match that is more plausible than I first thought it would be in a real world setting.

No. 264 (Summer 2015)

Editorial: Mark Jarman.

Fiction: Daniel Woodrell, Alice Peterson, Kathy Page, Mona'a Malik, D.R. MacDonald, Paul Leathers, Paige Cooper, Rod Moody-Corbett, Charlie Fiset, Kevin Hardcastle, Cynthia Flood, Mark Jacquemain, Rachel Adams, and Rob Doyle.

Reviews: Richard Cumyn, Clarissa Hurley, Richard Kelly Kemick, Ian Colford, Reid Lodge, and Susan Haley.

The Summer 2015 all-fiction is now available!

The Fiddlehead summer fiction issue is now available, and it’s the perfect read whether you’re lounging at the beach or sitting in a hammock. Spend those long, lazy, hazy days of summer, luxuriating in the fictional worlds of the fifteen stories gathered here. We have stories from established national and international writers such as Daniel Woodrell, D.R. MacDonald, and Kathy Page and stories from up-and-comers such as Charlie Fiset, Rod Moody-Corbett, and Mona’a Malik. And that's just some of the authors found within! . . .

M. Travis Lane launches Crossover on June 11 and other Fiddlehead news

All are invited to the launch of M. Travis Lane's new book of poetry, Crossover. which will take place next Thursday, June 11 at 7 pm. Lane is well known to readers of The Fiddlehead. Last summer, we featured a retrospective of her work, and her poems and reviews regularly appear in our pages. The event is taking place at Westminster Books in downtown Fredericton (445 King St.), and is free and open to the public.

An Interview with Sean Howard

By Rebecca Salazar

Sean Howard has won our 24th annual Ralph Gustafson Prize for Best Poem for "Cases (Unbound Poems, from Nova Scotia Reports)." Sean Howard is the author of Local Calls (Cape Breton University Press, 2009) and Incitements (Gaspereau Press, 2011). His poetry has been published in numerous Canadian and international magazines, nominated for a Pushcart Prize in the US, and anthologized in The Best Canadian Poetry in English (Tightrope Books, 2011 & 2014). Sean lives in the lobster-fishing village of Main-à-Dieu, Nova Scotia, and is adjunct professor of political science at Cape Breton University.

An Interview with Lisa Alward

By Reid Lodge

Lisa Alward has won The Fiddlehead's 24th annual Short Fiction Prize for her story "Cocktail." Originally from Halifax, Lisa Alward has a master’s degree in English from the University of London and was the Literary Press Group’s first sales manager. She presently lives in Fredericton, where she teaches courses in clear writing and has worked as an editor and freelance writer. She has been writing short fiction for three years. “Cocktail,” her second story to be published, is inspired by the cocktail party world of the sixties and early seventies.

Pages

Subscribe to The Fiddlehead RSS