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Stop! Look! Listen!

Stop! Look! Listen!

Stop! Look! Listen! is your one-stop destination for The Fiddlehead's cultural engagement.

State of the Art

By Nancy Bauer

One recent June evening I attended a mesmerizing concert at the home of artist Stephen May, the first “house concert” I’d ever attended. Six other guests came, so with the host and four musicians, we were a gathering of twelve. The intimate group was surrounded by seven glorious May paintings and one pitiful palm tree. The musicians were plainly dressed: no theatrical tricks or garish makeup. . . .

Kazim Ali’s Sublime Ordinary

By Ross Leckie

The sacred, the profane, and the glorious mundane shimmer through Kazim Ali’s poetry. The poems are visionary in the best sense of the word. They see both the translucence and the immanence of the world, a seeing that commingles vision, remembrance, and remembering, as he puts it in “Cover Me.” “Remembrance” is the odd word out here. Unlike vision and remembering, remembrance refers to something specific, a moment of history now commemorated. For Ali vision and remembering seem to step into a ceremony of memory that is elegiac, which can be as personal as a keepsake and as social as human slaughter: the museum, the monument, and the monumental. The visionary is given a body in these poems, through sex, embrace, travel, migration, and even something as simple as walking. . . .

Spring 2019 Introduction

By Sue Sinclair

I have just looked at the mock-up of the cover for the spring issue, and its millenial pink is making me consider the possibility that the shoulder-high snowbanks lining the driveway might not last forever. Thank you, Ian, designer extraordinaire. 

There is, of course, plenty beside the colour pink that makes this issue exciting. Kazim Ali, for starters. . . .

Ahmad Danny Ramadan

My Name is Bridge (an excerpt)

Mother told me my grandmother has lost her mind. She stood in the moonshine for too long and wandered up into the ocean of stars so deep it was hard for her to find her way back. She was swallowed whole by the myths of the past one night, and never could be retrieved. “Kharafet,” my mother said, “she lives in the land of fables now.” 

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2019 Poetry In Voice Competition Features Two Atlantic Canadian Semifinalists 

The Fiddlehead would like to congratulate the two Atlantic Canadian semifinalists in the 2019 Poetry In Voice Competition: Sophia Wilcott from Harbour View High School, Saint John, NB, and Berry Genge from Montague Regional High School, Montague, PEI. They are two of the 24 semifinalists chosen from over 10,000 students from 1,400 schools across Canada who will be competing for $25,000 in total prize money for themselves and their school libraries in an exciting, poetic evening at the National Finals Show, on Thursday, April 25th at the Winnipeg Art Gallery.

Upcoming Fiddlehead 2020 Event in Toronto

The Fiddlehead is coming to Toronto! We'll be hosting an Introductory Spoken Word Workshop — "The Ecology of Story: Writing with Mother Earth" 3pm-5:30pm, in room MW130 on the University of Toronto Scarborough Campus, with spoken word artists Sheniz Janmohamed and Mahlikah Awe:ri Enml'ga't Saqama'sgw (The Woman Who Stands and Walks In The Light). 

Later that evening, there will be an Open Mic at 7:30pm in room MW130 (workshop participants are encouraged, though not obligated, to perform!) featuring performances by Sheniz and Mahlikah on the theme of "Ecology." 

UNB Reading Series presents Phoebe Wang

The University of New Brunswick invites you to a literary reading by Phoebe Wang at 7:30 pm on Tuesday, March 19th at the Alumni Building Lounge on the Fredericton Campus.
 
Phoebe Wang is a poet and educator currently living in Toronto. Wang’s work explores the intersection between material and psychic geographies. Her poems engage in a kind of fieldwork, surveying gardens, communities, and the paradoxes of subsumed histories. With understated irony and unsettling imagery, her poems address the internal conflicts inherent in contemporary living.
 

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