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Stop! Look! Listen!

Stop! Look! Listen!

Stop! Look! Listen! is your one-stop destination for The Fiddlehead's cultural engagement.

Stretching the Snowy Pages Toward May Flowers

By Ross Leckie. Editor

Editorial 275: Spring Contest 

How can you not love Sweden? They have such simultaneous precision and poetic fog. Spring is defined as the first time the average daytime temperature rises above 0 degrees Celsius for seven consecutive days. So spring arrives all over Sweden on different days! Oh Canada. Is it our lot to call spring March, April and May? Surely we can join the CBC rebellion: “But in parts of Canada, spring doesn’t start until April, or even May!”

Two Fiddlehead Contributors Nominated for National Magazine Awards!

Congratulations to all the nominees for this year's National Magazine Awards, but especially to two Fiddlehead contributors Tammy Armstrong and Dominique Bernier-Cormier for being finalists in the Poetry category! Congrats also to our Creative Nonfiction editor Alicia Elliott as well for her nomination in the Essays category for "On Seeing and Being Seen: Writing with Empathy."

Poetry Month Event Features Fiddlehead Editor Ross Leckie

Join Fredericton’s Cultural Laureate, Ian LeTourneau, as he leads a panel of three local poets —Triny Finlay, M. Travis Lane, and Ross Leckie — with readings and discussion at the Fredericton Public Library on Thursday, April 26 from 7 – 8:30pm in the River Reading Room.

Triny Finlay is the author of two collections of poetry, Spitting Off (2004) and Histories Haunt Us (2010), both published by Nightwood Editions. Her most recent publication is the forthcoming chapbook, You Don’t Want What I’ve Got.

Translating Books to Ballet

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

By Kendra Guidolin

For four years, I studied two separate degrees: creative writing and dance. You can imagine the reactions I would receive as a double fine arts major, and the amount of questions I was asked about the combination of the two. But over the years of studying both, I noticed an overwhelming amount of connections between dance and literature. . . .

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