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Odd Sundays Presents Kathy Mac and Kerry-Lee Powell

Odd Sundays will commence once again at Corked Wine Bar, 83 Regent St. at 2 PM on Sunday, October 15 to mark the beginning of a new season of Fredericton’s favourite readings series. 2018 will be odd sunday’s 14th year, and we will start the year off by featuring Kathy Mac and Kerry Lee Powell as guest readers. The readings will be followed by an open mic and a book draw. 

14th Annual Poetry Weekend (+ Launch of Collected Poems of Alden Nowlan) Takes Place This Weekend!

The University of New Brunswick invites you to our 14th annual Poetry Weekend, a celebration of Canadian poetry featuring new and seasoned poets alike! 

Join us on Saturday, September 30th and Sunday, October 1st at UNB Fredericton’s Memorial Hall for a series of readings by Canadian poets. Featured guests for this year’s festivities include: Adam Dickinson, Linda Besner, Allison LaSorda, Brian Bartlett, Lucas Crawford, Claire Kelly, Jim Johnstone, and many more! Readings take place at 11am, 2pm, and 8pm on both days.

As an added bonus, please join us on Friday, September 29th at 7 pm in Memorial Hall to celebrate the release of Alden Nowlan’s Collected Poems with Goose Lane Editions. The evening will feature several national and local writers reading poetry by this beloved poet, and copies of Nowlan’s much-anticipated collection will be available for purchase. 

Introducing the Judges for our 27th Annual Literary Contest

Powell, L'Abbé. Houle, and Murakami

The Fiddlehead is pleased to announce the judges for our 27th annual literary contest! Kerry Lee Powell, this year's UNB Writer-in-Residence, is our fiction judge. And judging our poetry category are Sonnet L'Abbé, Jennifer Houle, and Sachiko Murakami. Our contest closes on December 1, 2017. See full contest submission guidelines here

Arcane 17

2017’s Summer Fiction Issue showcases great, sensuous stories from the east coast and west coast and around the world, including a wolf guarding a woman trapped in a crashed car, a teen’s fascination with shooting guns, a secret computer file and a zebra rug, flashers in the woods, a very funny exchange of old and young secretly sparring in a London restaurant, and of course, appropriation of Oscar Peterson’s piano bench in Australia.

Norman Dubie: The Details of Winter That Upset Us

By Ross Leckie, Editor.

I first came to the poetry of Norman Dubie as a student lurking in second-hand bookstores, finding bedraggled copies of his books, and taking them home with me. Well, I did pay for them, and then they paid me back. “These poems are as simple as ice,” I thought. Then I thought, “These poems are as damned complicated as ice. Slippery too.” If the devil is in the details, then so are the many gods of the living and the dead, and how we speak to them. 

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