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Fiction

An Interview with Myler Wilkinson

By Greg Brown Myler Wilkinson has won the 23rd annual Short Fiction Prize for his story "The Blood of Slaves." Myler Wilkinson has published award-winning short stories set in British Columbia in journals such as Prism International and Pierian Spring. He has spent extended periods in Russia and has written three books, including Hemingway and Turgenev: The Nature of Literary Influence. He lives in the Kootenay region of British Columbia. His winning story is written from the point of view of Anton Chekhov and is dedicated to the memory of Alexander Vaschenko, friend of the heart, mentor.

Don't Judge This Book By Its Title

By Zachary Alapi

A Review of J.R. Helton's Drugs

The subject matter of J.R. Helton’s Drugs (Seven Stories Press) might at first appear self-evident, but it is the combination of imbibed adventures, personal struggle, and the exploration of the effects various drugs have on the individual and his/her place in society that make this fictionalized memoir a layered, gripping read.

Grumpy Old Men (On Richler and Sendak)

By Sarah Bernstein

At my Jewish high school in Montreal, Mordecai Richler, of course, was a bit of a hero. Whether or not he liked it, and even though he relentlessly lampooned the Jewish community, he was still one of ours. February at our school was public speaking month. So, every February, the teachers compiled and distributed a list of quotations to all of us groaning, gawky teenagers — possible speech topics from which we were to choose. . . .

Breathe, Just Breathe: Christina Cooke on Zadie Smith's White Teeth

By Christina Cooke

Commendations on the novel’s thematic triumphs need not be contrived by this humble author as institutions such as The New Yorker, Guardian and Financial Times have safely lionized this text as one of the most celebrated of the past two decades. But the most striking yet undervalued aspect of White Teeth, from my reading, is Smith’s awareness of the constrictions placed upon writing by those reading it — of the insistent and insufferable question demanded ad naseum, “but what does this mean?" . . .

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