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"These Weeds" by Rose Maloukis

Rose Maloukis

These Weeds

Spasms trouble a tired body, little flesh, no hunger. 
Leaves cycle, vanish, more and more empty sky.

Dishes fallen to the floor. A mouthful of beaten rice — I cannot swallow! 

A purple balloon buffeted by slow circulation, no direct draft.
Surface highlights, rotations wobble, roll then lull, they are imbalanced.
Are you alive if your breath — the balloon, under the blouse, senseless —
         vacant.

Interview With Creative Nonfiction Contest Winner Morgan Charles

Morgan Charles' story Plagued was the winner of our 2020 Creative Nonfiction Contest. Recently, editorial board member William Bonfiglio spoke to Morgan about compassion, helplessness and writing during a pandemic. 

Plagued is featured in our upcoming Fall Issue 285. Click Read more for the full interview! 

Announcing the Winner of our 2020 Creative Nonfiction Contest!

The Fiddlehead is pleased to announce that Morgan Charles is the winner of our 2020 Creative Nonfiction Contest and $2000 prize! Morgan's story Plagued  will be featured in our upcoming Fall issue no. 285.  

Thank you to all who entered the creative nonfiction contest and congratulations to the fourteen finalists. And thanks again to our judge Ariel Gordon!

excerpt from "Blues Too Bright" by Kate Finegan

Kate Finegan's story "Blues Too Bright" won the fiction prize as part of The Fiddlehead's 26th annual literary contest. You can read an interview with her here.

 

Blues Too Bright

"Have you noticed the birds are shitting more lately?” Mother calls to ask. I wait for my eyes to focus and see that it’s six a.m. on the dot. I imagine she’s been sitting by the window since four, waiting for a reasonable hour to call. 

Fiddlehead Contributor Doyali Islam Interviewed on CBC's Sunday Edition

This past weekend, Fiddlehead contributor Doyali Islam was on CBC's Sunday Morning talkiing with Michael Enright about "her childhood, the role of poetry in political resistance, and why she became a practitioner of parkour." As part of the discussion, she read "poem for your pocket," which we published last Autumn (The Fiddlehead, no. 269)! 

You can listen to the interview here!

Les Murray and the Gorillas of Flame

Very recently, The Atlantic published “The Greatest Poet Alive: The Feral Genius of Australia’s Les Murray,” a gushing, appreciative overview of Murray’s career disguised as a review of his latest book Waiting for the Past. It is far from alone in its adoration of Murray’s distinguished career. Though he does have his detractors, and he was a major figure in Australia’s “poetry wars,” his name is regularly included on lists of potential Nobel Prize winners, and Joseph Brodsky’s claim that Murray is “quite simply, the one by whom the language lives” is oft-quoted.

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